Cucumber, courgette and cucamelon update!

Our cucumber, courgette and cucamelon plants are doing brilliantly. Following a slow start, the cucumber plant is coming on strides now and is much stronger. For a start, it could only support one cucumber at a time, but now it’s growing three or four with ease!

These are the last two cucumbers that we harvested from the plant.

 

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The cucamelons are also starting to be ready to harvest. As we hadn’t tried growing these before, we were dying to taste them! It turns out they are exactly as described, a slightly sour cucumber – but still an oddly refreshing taste!

The courgette plants are also still producing well. We have had some extremely hot weather in recent weeks, so we were worried at times that they were coming to the end of their life (as it was so difficult to get enough water into their pots!) However, they have really picked up again now it’s dropped a few degrees.

In fact, we had to tie them up to their stake again for support. They don’t seem to mind this, as long as you encourage them gently towards their stake. It also means they don’t take up too much room, as they go up rather than out!

A quick July update

Now the weather is warm and the days are long, everything grows surprisingly quickly. Here are a few photos of how our various crops are getting on.

The second sowing of radishes are starting to swell, so it won’t be long before we’re eating these! The beetroot are also getting almost big enough to eat – we can’t wait!

The cucamelons have already grown beyond the short canes we gave them in order to reach the main climbing trellis. I love their tendrils which keep them attached so securely to it! The courgettes are also producing lots of fruits now. I would say on average, one courgette every 2-3 days.

The cucumber plant is also growing steadily and was tied up to its batten for the first time at the weekend. You can see that the compost is not kept too wet around the cucumbers, as we find that their stems can often rot off where this is the case.

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The brassicas are also growing on nicely after we pricked them out last weekend. These will remain in the same pots until they’re planted out, so just need to be watered until then and monitored to make sure not pests decide to land!

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Planting out some more cucurbits

The cucamelons have continued to grow away as quickly as they started, and were moved outside last week to harden them off before planting out. We’ve never grown these before, so we’re not sure what we’re doing, but a quick Google search gave us some ideas.

They grow like a vine, so we fixed some plastic coated metal fencing up for them to climb up. You can see the little tendrils they already have growing which will help them to climb their way up. In fact, they were already a bit difficult to untangle from one another in the seed tray, so we don’t think they’ll have any trouble climbing up the fencing.

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We didn’t have much space left, so we had to plant four cucamelons in a 30 litre pot, with a small cane to support their journey up to the main fencing. Let’s see if they carry on growing at the same pace they have been!

One of the cucumbers we took from a cutting a couple of weeks ago was also ready to plant out. Similarly, it was planted out in a 30 litre pot, making sure not to put too much damp compost around the stem of the cucumber, as they can be a bit temperamental and we wanted to give it the best chance of not rotting off.

Like with the cucamelons, we have used a bamboo stick to support the plant until it reaches the batten that we’ve fixed to the fence for it to be trained along.

We’ll keep a close eye on the plant, as they can be difficult to get going, making sure not to water too heavily, and certainly not near the base of the stem.

Some growing top tips

Everyone prefers a cauliflower with a white curd. However, this means that you need to shelter the curd from sunlight, to prevent it going yellow. One way of achieving this is to tie the cauliflower leaves together at the top once you see a cauliflower starting to form.

 

Like us, our plants need food and water. However, there are ways you can help them to take up the food and water more easily and efficiently. The nodules which grow out of the stems of cucumber plants are roots waiting to hit soil! Although you have to be careful not to dampen the delicate cucumber stem too much and cause it to rot off, heaping a small amount of compost up around the stem gradually to enable these roots to form will only assist you with growing a stronger plant.

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Don’t sow anything directly into the soil – there are too many things out there to try and scupper your chances. Whether this be pests digging up and eating/scattering your seeds, the weather washing them out or being too cold to enable germination or pests eating off the new shoots once the seedlings germinate, we always find it’s best to sow seeds into cell trays or seed trays first, potentially pot on and then plant out when you have a more established plant.

These are another sowing of beetroot sown in cell trays. These will be planted out in the garden directly from these.

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Leeks are better the longer the blanch (the white bit) you can get on them. However, there are ways you can get the leeks to self blanch themselves, such as the below.

Dibber a hole about 9 inches deep and plop your leek seedling into the hole. Gently fill the hole with water and this will slightly back fill the hole you’ve made to cover the leek plants bare roots to enable it to grow. As the leek grows, the hole (providing it does not get completely backfilled) acts as a natural light blocker and therefore blanches the leek.

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